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The market demand for implantable biomedical systems continues to grow at a significant pace. Solving the technological hurdles of miniaturization, power supply and efficient interfaces between the implants and external devices is critical to the growth of the market. This symposium will examine the latest advances in design, manufacturing, reliability, wireless charging and communications for implantable biomedical systems from both a theoretical and practical standpoint.

Final Agenda

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

12:15 pm Registration

1:55 Chairperson’s Remarks

Mark Buccini, Director, Business Unit Strategy, Texas Instruments

Applications and Market for Wearables and Implantables (Shared Session)

2:00 OPENING KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Enabling New Applications with Multivariable Chem/Bio Sensors: From Ideas to Product

Radislav A. Potyrailo, PhD, Material Characterization & Chemical Sensing, GE Global Research Center

Modern monitoring scenarios of gases and liquids for industrial safety, environmental surveillance, medical diagnostics, and other applications demand sensing with higher accuracy, enhanced stability, and lower power consumption; often all in unobtrusive formats and at low cost. We are developing a new generation of sensors that bridge the gap between existing and required capabilities. Our methodology allows quantitation of individual chemical or biological components in mixtures, rejection of interferences, and correction for environmental instabilities.

2:30 Facilitating Collaboration to Advance the Commercialization of Nanosensors: The NNI Sensors Signature Initiative

Lisa Friedersdorf, Director, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, National Nanotechnology Initiative

3:00 The Emergence of New Sensing Capabilities from Commercially Available Sensors

Thomas Dawidczyk, Lead Analyst, Lux Research

3:30 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

Wireless Power for Implantables

4:00 Addressing the Unique Problems in Power Storage for Miniaturized Sensors

Erik Scott, PhD, Bakken Fellow, Technical Fellow, Director of Advanced Development, Medtronic

Successful implementation of miniaturized sensors demands that the power source not only maximizes power and energy density, but also exhibits robust performance over stressful use conditions and long product lifetimes. This entails three cell-level attributes: ability to recharge quickly; stable performance over many cycles and years; and robustness to extremes in voltage associated with overcharge and over-discharge. Characterization data of Medtronic’s OverdriveTM battery technology will be presented.

4:30 PANEL DISCUSSION: Expanding Implant Applications to Improve Outcomes for Future Applications

Moderator: Bill von Novak, Principal Engineer, Qualcomm

Panelists: Erik Scott, PhD, Bakken Fellow, Technical Fellow, Director of Advanced Development, Medtronic

Reza Sehdehi, Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, New Zealand

Farah Laiwalla, MD, PhD, Senior Research Associate, Neuroengineering and Nanophotonics Laboratory, Brown University

Deborah Munro, PhD, Adjunct Faculty, OHSU Department of Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation, Oregon Health and Science University; Biomedical Engineering Research Consultant, Munro Medical, LLC

This panel of experts will discuss what missing technology is keeping implants from seeing a wider application space. Also, how medical implants can improve outcomes for currently underserved populations, what is beyond medical implants and what implants can do beyond life support, therapeutic or palliative applications will be discussed.

5:30 End of Day

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

8:30 am Morning Coffee

Wireless Power for Implantables

8:55 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Erik Scott, PhD, Bakken Fellow, Technical Fellow, Director of Advanced Development, Medtronic

9:00 Sources of Energy for Medical Implants

Bill von Novak, Principal Engineer, Qualcomm

Medical implants need energy to operate - from nanowatts (cardiac rhythm management) to tens of watts (ventricular assist devices). Historically, this energy has come from either primary batteries, rechargeable batteries with wireless charging, or a wired power source. However, there are several other sources of energy available for medical implants, many of which are already present within the human body. This talk will describe some of those sources and how to harvest them for use in medical devices.

9:30 Effects of Conductive Tissue on Capacitive Wireless Power Transfer

Reza Sehdehi, Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, New Zealand

Biomedical devices are one of the most successful applications of Inductive Power Transfer (IPT) where it provides a lifetime of power without the risk of infection associated with percutaneous leads. In this study, it was found that the tissue medium is dominated by its conductive properties at low frequency. In the future, the model and the test phantom will be utilized to understand the implementation and safety challenges in applying the capacitive power technology for powering implantable devices.

10:00 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

10:45 Radiofrequency Ablation with a Wirelessly Powered Catheter and Generator

Julian Moore, UGA Medical Robotics Lab, The University of Georgia

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive medical procedure where tissue is burned in the body with electrical current. Current methods of RFA use several cords and wires that complicate the procedure and present the risk of cutting or shorting the circuit if they are damaged. This method streamlines the ablation procedure by reducing setup time and eliminating the need for those wires and chords that get in the way of the procedure. The wireless method also has an increased benefit to sterilization because the wireless needles are disposable and cheaper than the current catheters.

11:15 Wireless Power Transfer for Cardiovascular Implants

Paul Mitcheson, PhD, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London

Many types of cardiovascular implants such as loop recorders, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) require electrical power that is normally provided by implantable batteries or a driveline through an incision. The Wireless Power Lab is collaborating with the National Heart and Lung Institute at Imperial College London to develop wireless powering technology for next-generation cardiovascular implants. This talk focuses on the various engineering challenges, safety considerations and regulatory issues involved with integrating inductive power transfer into such implants and provides results from an initial feasibility study.

11:45 Miniaturized Hermetic Modules with Integrated Sensors and Communication for Implants

Eckardt Bihler, PhD, Business Development Manager, Dyconex, Switzerland

Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP), a thermoplastic dielectric material with superior material properties can be used both as the substrate material and as the encapsulation for small miniaturized implantable electronic and modules. Very small form factors can be obtained by integrating the communication coils into the LCP substrate. Encapsulation in LCP provides hermetically sealed and chemically inert miniaturized electronic modules with integrated sensors and electrodes for implanted medical applications.

12:15 pm Luncheon Presentation (Sponsorship Opportunity Available) or Enjoy Lunch on Your Own

1:40 Chairperson’s Remarks

Bill von Novak, Principal Engineer, Qualcomm

1:45 Circuits and System Design for Implantable Wireless Neural Sensors

Vincent Leung, PhD, Technical Director, Qualcomm Institute Circuits Labs, UCSD

Wireless biomedical implantable systems present unique engineering challenges to RF/analog circuit designers. This talk will start with a survey of circuits and system architectures, where key design parameters and their optimizations will be explained. We will then focus on a recent research of CMOS distributed wireless sensor IC’s for brain machine interface applications.

Advanced R&D and Commercialization for Implantables

2:15 From Wireless Implantable Sensors to an Implant System: A Biomedical Device Development Journey

Farah Laiwalla, MD, PhD, Senior Research Associate, Neuroengineering and Nanophotonics Laboratory, Brown University

An approach for large-scale adaptive sensor systems is critical for scaling biomedical implants beyond a few hundred channels. We describe the development of microscale sensor nodes, in the context of development of an adaptive wireless implant system that enables real-time networked access to thousands of nodes.

2:45 Incorporating Drug Eluting Features to Improve the Performance of Implantable Devices

James Arps, PhD, Director, Business Development, ProMed Pharma, LLC

The human body’s response to an implantable sensor or device can be unexpected and sometimes deleterious. The potential for infection, allergic reaction, or inflammatory response must be considered in design of the next generation of implantable systems. This talk will review approaches to delivery of therapeutic agents to mitigate such effects including formulations and designs to achieve optimal performance.

3:15 Networking Refreshment Break

3:30 Thin Film 3-D Hermetic Packaging of Sub-mm Wireless Microelectronic Sensor/Actuator Implants

Joonso Jeong, PhD, Assistant Professor, Pusan National University, Korea

Effective 3-dimensional hermetic encapsulation of sub-mm sized implantable microelectronic chiplets is demonstrated by thin (100 nm) multilayer dielectric HfO2/SiO2 atomic layer deposited coatings. Accelerated aging tests at 87 C in saline of recently developed wireless microchips for neural sensing devices predict many years of chronic implant utility as medical sensor implants.

4:00 Fabricating Implantable MEMS Sensors in Open Use Labs

Deborah Munro, PhD, Adjunct Faculty, OHSU Department of Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation, Oregon Health and Science University; Biomedical Engineering Research Consultant, Munro Medical, LLC

One of the major objectives of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), established in 2000, was to create user facilities and networks that were available to all. To alleviate this discrepancy for both smaller academic institutions and commercial enterprises, the NSF developed a new model of support known as NNCI. This presentation covers how to access and collaborate with one of the 16 open facilities located across the United States for fabricating your own biomedical implantable MEMS sensors and actuators at a reasonable cost.

4:30 End of Implantable Biomedical Systems